COVID-19 information and Dental Emergency Appointments

In recognition of ongoing news reports and the continued spread of the COVID-19 virus, we realize our patients have questions. As dedicated health care professionals, we want you to know that we remain as diligent as ever in protecting the health and safety of our patients and staff. Our practice strictly adheres to and exceeds the standards for infection control by wearing personal protective gear, using hospital-grade disinfectants, practicing the latest sterilization protocols, utilizing single-use disposable materials, and more. Every effort we have in place is to ensure the safety of our patients and staff. We want you to know that we are monitoring this situation very closely, and we will keep you updated regularly.

Symptoms of coronavirus are reported as flu-like, with varying degrees of severity. While we do not know everything about this virus to date, individuals who are elderly and/or immunocompromised appear to be the most at risk of a severe infection. To ensure your health and safety, and the health and safety of everyone at our practice, please reschedule your appointment if you or a member of your household has a cough, fever, and/or flu-like symptoms. In addition, please reschedule your appointment if you have traveled to any areas within the past 14 days that are at high risk for contracting the coronavirus.

We thank you in advance and extend our gratitude for your understanding and cooperation. Together, we can help keep everyone as safe and healthy as possible. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our office, and one of our staff members will be more than happy to assist you.

Please view and share our latest COVID-19 Symptom Comparison Chart with your friends and family.

For further information, including measures to keep yourself healthy, visit the following links:


Dental Emergency Appointments

What is a dental emergency?
A dental emergency is any situation that poses an immediate threat to the health of your teeth and supporting tissues. Dental emergencies are often the result of impact to the mouth, but they also can be caused by infection. To ensure the best possible outcome, any dental emergency should be evaluated by a professional immediately.

How soon should I be seen?
If you are experiencing a dental emergency, we recommend you contact Shelley Dental immediately. We will be able to advise what your treatment options are and what will be necessary to take care of the situation. We offer same-day emergency services for most conditions.

After Hours Emergencies:
For patients that have been already been seen in our office and are experiencing severe dental emergencies after hours, such as significant infection, pain or trauma please call our emergency number:

Dr. Stohl’s cell# 208-241-0514

What to do if a tooth is knocked out?
For permanent teeth that are knocked out, rinse the tooth and put it back in the socket. If you can’t get the tooth back in the socket, place it in a container of milk, water or saliva to keep it moist. Do not touch the roots (handle the tooth by the crown) and don’t brush the tooth. Contact us IMMEDIATELY for information and emergency treatment – the sooner you get to us, the more likely your tooth can be saved!

For baby teeth that are unexpectedly knocked out, leave them out and contact us immediately for instructions.

Other Emergency Dental Situations:
• Substantial Toothache
• Significant Sensitivity
• Swollen or Sore Gums
• Jaw Pain
• Infection
• Broken, Cracked and Chipped Teeth
• Broken Fillings
• Lost Crown

Pain Management:

If you can’t get into our office immediately, here is a list of effective home remedies to make you more comfortable while you wait for care:
• Warm water rinses for sore teeth and gums.
• Over the counter pain medication such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen (Tylenol)
• Ice packs applied to the outside of cheeks.
• Dental anesthetics containing benzocaine may be used as directed on the package for pain.
• Avoid overly hot and cold beverages and foods to reduce sensitivity.
• Heating pads may be used for jaw pain.
• Avoid chewing in the injured area.
• If a broken tooth has a sharp edge, cotton can be placed over it to protect soft tissues in your mouth.

Pain-Free Emergencies: Some dental emergencies may not cause pain initially. For example, a cracked tooth may not hurt, but it may lead to nerve damage in the roots. For this reason, all of the listed conditions need immediate attention, whether or not pain is present.

We are here to help! Please contact Shelley Dental if you have any emergency condition.